Alter Christus Servus
pitchersandpoets:

flipflopflyball:

My new thing for Getting Blanked: what if baseball had five bases? Link.

this is really really important

pitchersandpoets:

flipflopflyball:

My new thing for Getting Blanked: what if baseball had five bases? Link.

this is really really important

Cthulhu!

Cthulhu!

Waaaay cool!

The Hebrew people experienced fragmentation and weariness; they experienced divisions among their people. They were not the people they thought they were. The Jewish exodus is a rather perfect metaphor for spirituality.

When all of our idols are taken away, all our securities and defense mechanisms, we find out who we really are. We’re so little, so poor, so empty—and a shock to ourselves. But God takes away our shame, and we are eventually able to present ourselves in an honest and humble form. Then we find out who we really are and who God is for us.

Richard Rohr (via wordslessspoken)
If you want to reach a state of bliss, then go beyond your ego and the internal dialogue. Make a decision to relinquish the need to control, the need to be approved, and the need to judge. Those are the three things the ego is doing all the time. It’s very important to be aware of them every time they come up.
Deepak Chopra (via wordslessspoken)
ihavethisblog:

ieithoedd:

sterup:

alecofkerry:

memewhore:

“Romney’s family misspell their last name in the greatest Freudian slip in history.”

No R-Money was his name when he was a rapper

WHEN HE WAS A RAPPER

Yeah, he was a rapper. Him and Biggie D-S’aint-ur-rum rapped about bleh people.

D-S’aint-ur-rum
Dead.

This is a scream.  Poor Willard. :P

ihavethisblog:

ieithoedd:

sterup:

alecofkerry:

memewhore:

“Romney’s family misspell their last name in the greatest Freudian slip in history.”

No R-Money was his name when he was a rapper

WHEN HE WAS A RAPPER

Yeah, he was a rapper. Him and Biggie D-S’aint-ur-rum rapped about bleh people.

D-S’aint-ur-rum

Dead.

This is a scream.  Poor Willard. :P

caughtdeadinthat:

This is one of the more bracingly honest headstones I’ve seen.
(Photo by BrewBug)

caughtdeadinthat:

This is one of the more bracingly honest headstones I’ve seen.

(Photo by BrewBug)

damned Christofascists

damned Christofascists

Best darned Study Bible out there.

Name: Alicia

Tumblr Name: ihavethisblog

Nickname(s): Ali, “the other ali”

Birthday: Feb 24

Relationship Status: free as a bird with standards that are probably unreasonably high but igaf

Random fact about you: I still have my childhood blanket and will probably have it until I die

name: jon
Tumblr name: eggerhaus
nicknames: deke, fahjah
birthday: 13.06.58
relationship status: 2nd marriage.  Most people are unaware that my wife is bi-racial.
random fact about me: I almost died twice during lung surgery in 2009.  I have no memory of this and I am not afraid to die.  I have a terminal lung disease and have an expected life expectancy of two more years…but I’m feeling quite well today and have plans to prove the doctors wrong.  In the meantime, if I die of something other than pulmonary sarcoidosis I will be *most* amused.  I am ordained to Holy Orders in the Episcopal Church.
hobbies/interests: baseball, cemeteries, and I have a collection of over 200 giraffes and a fair amount of Native American pottery.  I also love to preach…I love exegesis!
do you smoke/drink: I have been clean and sober for over six years thanks to AA.  I smoke like a chimney.
why Tumblr? I am easily bored.

Umm, yeah, Noot, yeah.
(via Newt Gingrich Understands America)

Umm, yeah, Noot, yeah.

(via Newt Gingrich Understands America)

Way cool Bible app..love it!

Why me?

So I have this amazing sermon in my brain for this Sunday and today the rector pops his head in my office with an “oh by the way,  there will be two baptisms at the 8am Eucharist” moment.  Do I stick with the propers?  Do I bring out my sermon on baptism?  Or do I do the right thing and meld the two together?

Healing and baptism?  hmm… 

biomedicalephemera:

Pieds d’Oiseaux - The Feet of Birds
You can clearly see the wide range of foot structures found in the Neornithes, and the intended usage of some of them is pretty obvious. When it comes to classifying the foot structure of birds, there are several characteristics that are noted, but the defining factor is the orientation of the digits (toes). Birds generally have four toes.
One term you might not know that’s important is the hallux - this is the innermost (“first”) digit of the foot, homologous to the big toe in humans. In birds, it often points backwards. It’s sometimes very well-developed (such as in perching birds), and sometimes so small it’s almost absent.
Anisodactyly (“unequal digit”) - This configuration is basically the standard. The three toes face forward, with the hallux facing backwards, so as to let the bird perch. This is present in songbirds and perching birds. Hawks, eagles, and falcons also have this configuration.
Syndactyly (“same digit”) - The third and fourth toes (outer and middle) are united for much of their length, and have a broad sole in common. You can see this in the kingfisher and the bee-eaters.
Zygodactyl (“yoke digit”) - The toes are arranged with digits 2 and 3 facing forwards, and digits 1 and 4 facing backwards. You can see this in parrots, woodpeckers, and roadrunners.
Heterodactyl (“different digit”) - Toes 1 and 2 are facing back, with 3 and 4 facing forward. This is only found in trogons.
Pamprodactyl (“Every digit”) - All four digits face forward, only found in swifts - this is a somewhat contested classification, as it’s believed that no birds use this as a primary configuration, even if swifts have been observed using it during their rare landings.
There are other useful terms when classifying birds by their foot structure, that have more to do with the type of bird itself, rather than the configuration of its bones. These classifications can include birds with more than one dactylous configuration.
Raptorial - Feet like the raptors and owls. These are strong, deeply cleft, with sturdy talons, meant for grasping and ripping.
Semipalmate - “Half-webbed” feet, where the anterior toes are only partially webbed. The Semipalmated Plover is a bird with these feet.
Totipalmate - “Fully webbed” feet, with all four toes united by one web - these are found on birds like cormorants.
Palmate - “Webbed” feet. These are your “basic” webbed feet - the three front toes are united, like in gulls and ducks. The fourth digit is not connected to the web.
Lobate - A swimming foot with a series of lobes along the toes. Found in birds like grebes.
Tableau Elementaire de l’Histoire Naturelle des Animaux par Georges Cuvier. 1798.

Cuz birds got feet, that’s why.

biomedicalephemera:

Pieds d’Oiseaux - The Feet of Birds

You can clearly see the wide range of foot structures found in the Neornithes, and the intended usage of some of them is pretty obvious. When it comes to classifying the foot structure of birds, there are several characteristics that are noted, but the defining factor is the orientation of the digits (toes). Birds generally have four toes.

One term you might not know that’s important is the hallux - this is the innermost (“first”) digit of the foot, homologous to the big toe in humans. In birds, it often points backwards. It’s sometimes very well-developed (such as in perching birds), and sometimes so small it’s almost absent.

Anisodactyly (“unequal digit”) - This configuration is basically the standard. The three toes face forward, with the hallux facing backwards, so as to let the bird perch. This is present in songbirds and perching birds. Hawks, eagles, and falcons also have this configuration.

Syndactyly (“same digit”) - The third and fourth toes (outer and middle) are united for much of their length, and have a broad sole in common. You can see this in the kingfisher and the bee-eaters.

Zygodactyl (“yoke digit”) - The toes are arranged with digits 2 and 3 facing forwards, and digits 1 and 4 facing backwards. You can see this in parrots, woodpeckers, and roadrunners.

Heterodactyl (“different digit”) - Toes 1 and 2 are facing back, with 3 and 4 facing forward. This is only found in trogons.

Pamprodactyl (“Every digit”) - All four digits face forward, only found in swifts - this is a somewhat contested classification, as it’s believed that no birds use this as a primary configuration, even if swifts have been observed using it during their rare landings.

There are other useful terms when classifying birds by their foot structure, that have more to do with the type of bird itself, rather than the configuration of its bones. These classifications can include birds with more than one dactylous configuration.

Raptorial - Feet like the raptors and owls. These are strong, deeply cleft, with sturdy talons, meant for grasping and ripping.

Semipalmate - “Half-webbed” feet, where the anterior toes are only partially webbed. The Semipalmated Plover is a bird with these feet.

Totipalmate - “Fully webbed” feet, with all four toes united by one web - these are found on birds like cormorants.

Palmate - “Webbed” feet. These are your “basic” webbed feet - the three front toes are united, like in gulls and ducks. The fourth digit is not connected to the web.

Lobate - A swimming foot with a series of lobes along the toes. Found in birds like grebes.

Tableau Elementaire de l’Histoire Naturelle des Animaux par Georges Cuvier. 1798.

Cuz birds got feet, that’s why.